Printed from http://www.electronista.com

Verizon optimzes P2P, sees 60% speed boost

updated 09:30 am EDT, Fri March 14, 2008

Verizon P4P

Verizon today revealed that it has found a way to at once improve the speed of peer-to-peer Internet sharing services while simultaneously lightening the load on its own network. Nicknamed "P4P," the technique has the software look primarily for download sources from the user's own Internet provider rather than just performing a search. By prioritizing nearby connections, the optimization speeds up connections by about 60 percent; it also eliminates a major bottleneck for the provider itself. As Verizon or other companies can often keep this P2P traffic to its local network, it can avoid paying for the extra bandwidth needed to reach an Internet backbone.

P4P is primarily intended for peer networks where the content is primarily known to be legitimate, says Verizon, such as Pando. The service plans to offer free NBC TV shows in April and may help offset some of the content costs by reducing the bandwidth use. It's not known whether other legitimate but more open services, such as Vuze, will receive similar treatment. Services known to harbor large amounts of illegal content are unlikely to receive any help, according to the telecoms firm.

The approach represents a sharp contrast to Comcast, which has admitted that it deliberately throttles traffic for BitTorrent and a handful of other peer to peer services in an attempt to reduce the overall load on its network. Verizon argues that it sees better results through cooperation rather than using punishment.



By Electronista Staff
Post tools:

TAGS :

toggle

Comments

  1. DrunkenTech

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Nov 2005

    0

    Verizon as the good guy?

    Given, this might not be for ALL p2p networks, but this is evidence that they can do some creative thinking and figure out how to reduce THEIR costs while giving better results to the customer. SMRT!

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    0

    bad picture

    BTW, guys, the picture you used is for verizon wireless, which forbids P2P traffic on its wireless data network.

    But they also say they're only doing this for networks that are generally known to be 'safe'. So Limewire/et.al. isn't optimized (which is stupid, because it then still costs you more by not optimizing 'possibly illegal' content).

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    0

    oh

    BTW, read the article on arstechnica.com on this. P4P isn't a verizon concept, but that they're part of a workgroup "devising a new protocol for what researchers describe as carrier-grade peer-to-peer file transfer systems."

    It also indicates that these are tests that were done, and not an actual implementation now. And no mention of when.

  1. robttwo

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Nov 2005

    0

    a-hem

    Kinda makes Comcast look like a*******, doesn't it? Pretty smart marketing - especially in light of the current FCC investigation.

    Now, back to Comcast - Doofuses.

  1. zaghahzag

    Dedicated MacNNer

    Joined: Aug 2006

    0

    wait a minute..

    They're deciding what bandwidth gets priority service. This is a not very subtle form of censorship. My ISP shouldn't be in the business of reading my email or trying to figure out if I'm downloading a movie or the latest Linux distro.

    This is the first step toward an internet that only allows you to do what you're told.

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    0

    Re: wait

    It's a protocol to allow for searching your own network before forwarding requests up the food chain. The goal isn't to give 'priority' service (That's done already in other ways, like ESPN360). This is more akin to using akamai for hosting.

    And, please note there is nothing here that blocks your internet service at all, so it reaches no where to the 'only allowing to do what you're told'. That's comcast.

  1. zaghahzag

    Dedicated MacNNer

    Joined: Aug 2006

    0

    whats the difference

    They favor P2P networks that are "legal". All of them are legal, people with files on a p2p network might be doing copyright infringement. Why not make this technology available to all p2p networks. it's censorship.

Login Here

Not a member of the MacNN forums? Register now for free.

toggle

Network Headlines

toggle

Most Popular

Sponsor

Recent Reviews

Crucial MX100 256GB SATA-3 SSD

While the price-per-gigabyte ratio for magnetic platter-based hard drives can't be beat, the speed that a SSD brings to the table for ...

Narrative Clip

With the advent of social media technology, people have been searching for new ways to share the events of their daily lives -- be it ...

Blue's Mikey Digital

Blue Microphones, a company that makes some of the most popular digital USB microphones among podcasters and musicians, has for some t ...

Sponsor

toggle

Most Commented

 
toggle

Popular News