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Denon shows reference-quality Blu-ray player

updated 04:15 pm EDT, Fri October 24, 2008

Denon reference BD player

Denon has recently announced the upcoming release of a high-end Blu-ray player that promises reference-standard playback, the DVD-3800BD. It's the first Blu-ray player to use the 10-bit Silicon Optix sxT2 HQV Realta chipset to provide the player with highest resolution HD video currently offered via an HDMI 1.3a connection with 36-bit deep color support. To ensure high-quality sound reproduction, Denon used a DDSC-HD audio output along with dual 32-bit floating-point Burr Brown DSPs and its AL24 processors and Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio decoders.

Attention to detail was paid to other design aspects of the player to reduce noise and other signal-degrading interference. Among them is a drive mechanism with dual-layer top and triple-layer bottom shields, a Suppress Vibration Hybrid loader for smooth disc handling and operation as well as separate video and power circuits.

An SD card slot is included on the front panel for quick viewing of photos captured by digital cameras.

The DVD-3800BD will cost the equivalent of about $2,500 in the UK and will be available in silver, a premium silver and black when it hits store shelves in December. The US equivalent retails for nearly $2,000 and is called the DVD-3800BDCI. [via Pocket-lint]











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