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Apple sees rare Mac shipment drop in Q1

updated 05:00 pm EDT, Wed April 15, 2009

IDC PC Share Q1 2009

Apple is poised to ship fewer Macs to the US year-over-year in a quarter for the first time in multiple quarters, according to early estimates from IDC. Researchers believe Apple will have shipped 1.13 million Macs in its home country in the first quarter of 2009, or a 1.2 percent drop versus the same stretch one year earlier. The company will have ultimately gained a slight amount of market share, moving from 7.2 percent to 7.6, but will also been one of only two firms in the top 5 computer vendors to have shipped fewer systems in winter 2009 than in 2008, with Dell being the other exception.

The Mac producer is therefore likely to keep its fourth-place position but also won't have dislodged its competitors. HP should have shipped about 12.2 percent more PCs year-over-year, cresting at 4.13 million delivered between January and March and netting 27.6 percent of the market; Dell dropped 16.2 percent to 3.93 million and 26.3 percent share, while Acer grew 13.4 percent to 1.58 million PCs and 10.5 percent share. Toshiba occupies fifth place with 987,000 PCs shipped and 6.6 percent share but an increase in shipments of about 18.7 percent.

US results are seen as having come out of the economic crash "better than expected" and actually outperformed even developing countries, where PC adoption rates normally clime much faster. IDC doesn't specifically explain the declines of either Apple or Dell but notes that poor desktop sales and the influx of netbooks, which aren't dominated by either company, gave support to those companies which focused heavily on lower-cost notebooks. Apple and Dell primarily focused on upscale notebooks during the period, such as the new unibody MacBook line and the Studio XPS series.

Worldwide, the PC market largely remained static and again gave the nod to HP, which shipped 13 million PCs and grew its PC shipments by a slight 2.9 percent, handing it 20.5 percent of the market. Dell dropped on the international stage as well, shipping 16.7 percent fewer PCs and declining to 8.65 million PCs and 13.6 percent share. Acer delivered 6.8 percent more PCs, supplying 7.33 million units and achieving 11.6 share; Lenovo shipped 8 percent fewer computers but remained steady with 7 percent share and 4.4 million computers, while Toshiba's US success was echoed in an 11.6 percent rise to 3.45 million PCs and a lift to 5.4 percent share.

IDC doesn't break down individual statistics for those companies that fall outside of the top 5 in each category, though Apple usually has world market share near 3 percent.





By Electronista Staff
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Comments

  1. luckyday

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Apr 2008

    0

    Waiting.

    Noooooooo. Its because the new iphone is coming out in June. People are waiting to buy laptops. Tsk tsk.

  1. dshan

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Aug 2002

    0

    Estimates, Not Facts

    Why do the media keep publishing these guesses by "analysts" like IDC as fact when they're not? IDC are infamous for getting this stuff wrong again and again (they often turn out to be out by 10, 20 even 30%) and yet they're still taken seriously and reported as fact.

    In less than a week from now we'll know the facts when Apple release their official audited sales figures, until then it's just guesswork.

  1. starwarrior

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Mar 2006

    -3

    Wrong Grouping

    Personal Computers are PCs

    Macintosh Computers are Macs

    Netbooks are neither. Put them in their own category.

  1. luckyday

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Apr 2008

    0

    starwarrior

    Why are they neither? They are small computers usually running windows, or linux. What makes a netbook so unique that they need their own group? Just the fact that apple doesn't have one?

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    +2

    Re: starwarrior

    Obviously they are neither because Apple doesn't make them. Since they don't make netbooks, including them in the rankings will only diminish Apple's standing. Only like computer purchases should be counted. Therefore, they should also take out all mini-tower computers and all large-screen consumer notebooks.

    Then again, I got confused by his "Personal Computers are PCs" line. Of course they are PCs. That's what PC stands for. How a Mac or a Netbook isn't a Personal computer is beyond me.

  1. ff11

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Apr 2004

    -1

    Re: starwarrior

    Or we could continue to include netbooks and tablets and count the iPod Touch among them.

  1. luckyday

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Apr 2008

    -1

    ff11

    Good idea. And we should count LCD screens on home appliances too.

    Do you really think the ipod touch provides the same performance and capabilities as a netbook? Get real.

  1. ff11

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Apr 2004

    +1

    luckyday

    Performance? Probably. Capabilities? More than some, less than some. There is no standard set of capabilities for netbooks, no standard OS, no standard hardware, no standard supported applications. Simply put, netbooks are small, highly portable, underpowered computers while LCD screens are not.

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