Printed from http://www.electronista.com

Barnes & Noble's dual-screen Nook reader official

updated 02:50 pm EDT, Tue October 20, 2009

Nook uses AT&T 3G, matches Kindle price

Barnes and Noble lived up to promises today and launched the Nook, its own e-book reader. The device is unique in having both a six-inch E-Ink display and a 3.5-inch color touchscreen LCD that serves to navigate and browse books. Also unlike most other readers in its class, it has both 802.11g Wi-Fi as well as AT&T-driven 3G to download books from Barnes and Noble's online bookstore.

Most books will be stored on 2GB of internal memory, but an SD card slot gives room for more. Barnes and Noble additionally plans to offer the Nook in multiple colors beyond the more traditional white.

The Nook's software is just as unique and brings a predicted sharing feature: owners can lend rights to a book to others for two weeks, including to smartphones and computers as well as other Nooks. Like the Kindle, the store's reader bookmarks properly regardless of screen size and lets users round-trip texts between the Nook and an iPhone, a BlackBerry or a computer.

Its OS is based on Google's Android, according to the bookseller, though it doesn't have access to the web or traditional third-party apps.

Pre-orders start today and have the Nook costing as much as Amazon's recently price-dropped Kindle, at $259. Barnes and Noble hasn't said when the device will ship but does promise free Wi-Fi access for all Nooks at its retail chain.





By Electronista Staff
toggle

Comments

  1. MyRightEye

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Apr 2008

    +3

    Hi Kate...

    I'd love to know more about your nook. How about tonight at 7.

  1. simdude

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Jun 2004

    -2

    appearance

    well, it looks prettier than a Kindle anyway. Sort of Apple-like actually.

  1. Feathers

    Grizzled Veteran

    Joined: Oct 1999

    0

    love the way...

    I love the way "clever" type girls are always brunettes! Seriously, if the interface is a as sluggish and has those idiosyncratic flashes in real life, there's no way I'd buy one, even from pretty Kate! It's not like an eReader needs huge processing power. What gives?

  1. djbeta

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Jan 2004

    -1

    Oh my God!!! how horrible !!!


    Notice the screen flickering to black and then back to white every time she does something like change a page or changing the font size ??? That's just plain awful.

    Almost as awful is how choppy the images scroll left and right in the lower window.


    The only thing going for this device is the Barnes & Nobles affiliation & library.

  1. c4rlob

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: May 2009

    -2

    love the color touchscreen

    The idea to combine e-ink screen with a full-color touch screen is brilliant, and the fact that Barnes & Noble is offering free wi-fi in all their stores for the Nook will help it steal customers away from Kindle. Hopefully the screen response is better than the video indicates. I think Amazon screwed up by keeping the Kindle so boring for so long.
    And I tried the website www.nook.com - but got nothing! Not a good sign B&N

  1. andrewbw

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Jan 2001

    +4

    Umm..

    More MacNN comment hilarity. The "flash" between change-states is a side effect of how e-paper works. All e-paper readers look like this (including the Kindle), as they are not constant-state LCDs. The difference is, they are also much easier to read when displaying content, and consume almost zero battery power.

    There, now you actually learned something.

  1. danviento

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Dec 2005

    +1

    Color and Contrast... Price

    Is it just me, or does the glaring backlight of the navigation screen look like it would really distract from the dimmer reading screen? In full sunlight, there wouldn't be too much difference. Maybe with an auto-adjust ambience sensor, it wouldn't be so annoying.

    Even at the $259 pricepoint, I can't see myself buying books for $10+, much less the $17+ prices seen elsewhere. You know it's ridiculously cheaper to sell digital copies by the customer than to have to print and stock and ship large lots of physical books. Until we're seeing paperback prices or cheaper, almost all of the readers I know are going to stay away from ebooks.

    That being said, I do have a reader from a few years ago, and I do like having hundreds of books traveling along with me. The battery lasts for days straight worth of reading. Why don't I upgrade? Because I want full control of my content with tethered syncing, not wireless cloud syncing. I want my hundreds of scanned books under my control.

    Ok, who can call me crazy to day? Show of hands.

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    -2

    Re: love the touchscreen

    The idea to combine e-ink screen with a full-color touch screen is brilliant, and the fact that Barnes & Noble is offering free wi-fi in all their stores for the Nook will help it steal customers away from Kindle.

    Oooh, free wifi. Except the Kindle works on it's own wireless network and doesn't need wifi.

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    0

    Re: Contrast

    Is it just me, or does the glaring backlight of the navigation screen look like it would really distract from the dimmer reading screen? In full sunlight, there wouldn't be too much difference. Maybe with an auto-adjust ambience sensor, it wouldn't be so annoying.


    Based on what the video shows, I would think the bottom part disappears after some inactivity, or hitting the home button makes it go away.

  1. malax

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Aug 2006

    0

    Nice, but

    This looks like a very nice competitor to the Kindle. My problem with any of these devices, however, is persistence of media. If I'm going to pay $10 or more for a book, I want to have it forever. Currently the ebook market is brand new with unproven proprietary formats. If I buy dozens of book on a Kindle and decide a few years from now I like the Nook instead, I can't transition those Kindle books (and vice versa of course). The same argument was made with music from the iTunes store of course, but non-DRM AAC is now a robust standard and we'll have no trouble converting those files to something else in the future. Not so with these book formats, right?

    Obviously if you're the type (and perhaps most people are) who reads a book once and then gives it away, then this isn't a major issue for you. Me, I like keeping books I read so I can read them again or lend them to friends. I can do without the physical book, but I want some assurance of long-term persistence.

Login Here

Not a member of the MacNN forums? Register now for free.

toggle

Network Headlines

toggle

Most Popular

Sponsor

Recent Reviews

SMS Audio Sync Sport on-ear headphones

When hitting the gym or going out for a trail run, headphones can cause a number of problems. From the ear buds getting slimy with swe ...

Adesso Xtream S3B Bluetooth speaker

Finding a speaker purpose-built for a specific need is challenging. Even when a Bluetooth speaker can be paired with a mobile device, ...

JBL Synchros E40BT headphones

For all the different configurations of headphones on the market, it's always a tough choice for buyers to get something that is just ...

Sponsor

toggle

Most Commented

 
toggle

Popular News