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Study: 55% don't see netbooks as true laptops

updated 03:10 pm EST, Tue February 16, 2010

More than half view netbooks as companions only

Over half of users don't consider a netbook a true portable, according to a new PriceGrabber study (PDF). About 55 percent believe that only a full-size notebook can work as a primary system, and a roughly similar 63 percent see a netbook only as a extra device for carrying on the road. Only 14 percent would actually consider one of the under-11-inch systems as a main computer.

Most of the objections (54 percent) stem from the overly small design, while half object equally to the lack of an optical drive and the low storage. Only a relative minority actually complain about overall performance (38 percent) or specific issues like media playback (26 percent) as well as games or HD video (16 percent).

Even so, the study still shows netbooks having a significant impact on sales. The average price of a portable has dropped about 20 percent year-over-year to just $645, or half of what it was three years earlier. They may also be setting expectations for price: although 52 percent spent $750 or more the last time they bought a computer, only 35 percent plan to do the same the next time they purchase.

About 15 percent of those talked to own a netbook and primarily use it for browsing or e-mailing. ASUS' well-known Eee PC 1005HA is the top-selling netbook at PriceGrabber and owes much of its success to its $279 price tag; the Toshiba NB205 and Dell Mini 10v are close behind with $342 and $349 prices. Acer's Aspire One D250, Lenovo's IdeaPad S10 as well as Samsung's N120 and Go help fill out the charts in addition to other Eee PCs.

The figures potentially play well into the hands of companies like Apple, which is one of the few holdouts refusing to produce netbooks. Average prices for MacBooks are higher even than 2006 levels, and its tablet theoretically addresses their core needs while addressing complaints about size. However, the lack of significant storage and a significant amount of productivity apps are possible drawbacks, as are prices that will largely be above the average price of a full PC.







By Electronista Staff
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Comments

  1. wrenchy

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Nov 2009

    +2

    Uhhhhh.

    Is that not why they are called.... NETBOOKS?? If they were true laptops, wouldn't the manufacturers label them as....say.... LAPTOPS? For those buying netbooks expecting they to replace a regular laptops deserve to get a slap.

    Another useless and pointless survey.

  1. wrenchy

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Nov 2009

    +2

    Hellooooo?

    Yes they did. It's called the iPad - the netbook without a cover and keyboard.


    >> The figures potentially play well into the hands of companies like Apple, which is one of the few holdouts refusing to produce netbooks.

  1. iphonerulez

    Dedicated MacNNer

    Joined: Nov 2008

    +1

    Netbooks = Cheap

    That's the main selling point of a netbook. Most likely the profit loss leader in the computer industry. Built for the poorest countries in the world, it somehow ended up becoming popular in the U.S. If the American computer companies had their choice of eliminating any computing device they made, it would be the netbook.

    The iPad can't replace the netbook. The people buying netbooks won't cough up the money for any tablet which will surely cost more than a netbook. The iPad will reach another sector of consumer who is more interested in ease of use than cost.

    Netbook fanboys say that they can do nearly everything with a netbook, but a netbook was basically designed for browsing and emails. It might be able to do everything else, but everything else it does less than satisfactory.

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    -2

    Re: Netbooks = cheap

    Netbook fanboys say that they can do nearly everything with a netbook, but a netbook was basically designed for browsing and emails. It might be able to do everything else, but everything else it does less than satisfactory.

    Does it not depend on what one wants to do with a netbook? If you're on the road for business, it can surely run everything you need.

    And what does one need? Mail, internet. Maybe Office for some things (esp. presentations). No, you can't run Adobe Photoshop, but most computer users don't use adobe photoshop.

    And what is your definition of 'satisfactorily'? What isn't it doing? And, yes, it isn't going to run your apps like a $2000 MBP. Then again, who in the world except for the netbook haters like yourself would expect mid-range or high-end performance at a bottom-range price?

  1. aristotles

    Grizzled Veteran

    Joined: Jul 2004

    0

    @Testudo

    Everything you said can be done on the iPad.

    Mail? Check
    Internet? Check
    Create Office documents? Check
    Show a presentation in up to 1024x768 to a projector? Check

    So will you be lining up to buy an iPad? You just made a great business case for the iPad.

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    0

    Re: @Testuddo

    And everything you said can be done on a netbook, yet cheaper. Plus you can do a whole lot more, because you can run all the apps you already have, including custom apps your company uses and doesn't require anyone to have to fund a whole re-write of their software. Plus you have better access to technologies like SSH, VPN, etc, that will allow you to access various company services.

    But the biggest difference is what you need to use one or the other. You NEED a computer to use the iPad for syncing and setup. You can use a netbook all by itself.

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