Printed from http://www.electronista.com

Intel rolls out speed updates to mobile Core i5, Core i7

updated 09:10 am EDT, Mon September 27, 2010

Intel adds Core i5 580M, Core i7 640M and ULV CPUs

Intel today unveiled its second wave of 32nm notebook processors today with a refresh of its Core i5 and Core i7 lines. Full-speed, dual-core processors have been upgraded across the board; the Core i7 640M upgrades to 2.8GHz (from 2.66GHz) for $349 in bulk; the Core i5 580M moves the top i5 chip to 2.66GHz (from 2.53GHz) for $266, and the slightly detuned but same-speed Core i5 560M costs $225.

Low- and ultra-low voltage processors have also undergone similar upgrades. The relatively full-speed, 2.26GHz Core i7 660LM costs $346. Ultra low voltage models for ultraportables top out at the 1.46GHz Core i7 680UM ($317) and also include the 1.33GHz i5 560UM ($250).

All models share Turbo Boost and clock considerably higher than their regular speeds when one of the cores isn't needed. Core i5 and i7 notebook models are separated only by cache, as i7 models have 4MB of Level 2 cache while i5 versions are pared down to 3MB.

Two Celeron models, the P4600 and T3500, are available and cost $86 and $80.

Computer builders are expected to start using the faster processors almost immediately and already include Sony but should cover most others, such as Apple's MacBook Pro and Air lines as well as higher-end Dell, HP and Toshiba notebooks.



By Electronista Staff
toggle

Comments

Login Here

Not a member of the MacNN forums? Register now for free.

toggle

Network Headlines

toggle

Most Popular

Sponsor

Recent Reviews

Dell AD211 Bluetooth speaker

For all of the high-priced, over-engineered Bluetooth speakers in the electronics market, there is still room for mass-market solution ...

VisionTek 128GB USB Pocket SSD

USB flash drives dealt the death blow to both the floppy and Zip drives. While still faster than either of the old removable media, sp ...

Kodak PixPro SL10 Smart Lens Camera

Smartphone imagery still widely varies. Large Megapixel counts don't make for a good image, and the optics in some devices are lacking ...

Sponsor

toggle

Most Commented

 
toggle

Popular News