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PhotoFast asked to halt MacBook Air SSD upgrade production

updated 10:40 pm EST, Mon November 29, 2010

PhotoFast told to stop MB Air SSD kits by Apple

PhotoFast may have been asked by Apple to halt production of its SSD upgrade kit for the new MacBook Air. One source said that the Japanese storage maker had been asked to stop production a week ago. The reasons were unknown, the tipster told 9 to 5 that PhotoFast agreed to keep its involvement in Apple's MFi accessories program.

The halt wasn't necessarily permanent, and PhotoFast was reportedly waiting to see if it could resume production, according to the source.

Apple has put a halt to third-party accessories in the past, most recently HyperMac's external batteries as well as third-party adapters and cables, but these have usually centered on companies using patented technologies without a license, such as the MagSafe notebook connector. PhotoFast's accessory is adapted to the unique narrow SSD connector used on the MacBook Air, but the interface is standard SATA and isn't known to be violating a patent. The chipsets themselves are also standard and based on SandForce's memory controller.

Neither Apple nor PhotoFast has had an opportunity to comment on the rumored production freeze.



By Electronista Staff
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Comments

  1. wrenchy

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Nov 2009

    -7

    Why else??


    So Apple can rip you off for a "iGenuine" "iCertified" replacement upgrade module from the "Mac Store".

    Why else? iDuh?

  1. IxOsX

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Feb 2009

    -5

    Hummmm??!?!?!

    For me looks like Apple is bullying. Why Apple would not allow to third party companies to build and sell accessories for Apple Macbook Air, if they not compromise patents and the machines integrity? What is next? HDD? USB Storage Pens? RAM?

    Don't like what I see.

  1. DiabloConQueso

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Jun 2008

    +8

    Fanboys and detractors alike...

    ...need to calm down.

    The article plainly states that Apple "asked" them to stop production -- not "sent them a cease and desist" letter. The article also plainly states that this stoppage may not be permanent. Both of these point to the conclusion that Apple wants to work with this provider to ensure that whatever they're doing is legit and up-to-spec, not that they're trying to reign supreme control over the innards of the MacBook Air just because they can, or are somehow imposing "heavy handed control-freak policies."

    As far as the fanboys swing in one direction, it seems to be counter-balanced by the opposition swinging just as far in the opposite direction (both WAY too far off-center as far as anyone should be concerned).

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    0

    Re: Fanboys and detractors alike...

    The article plainly states that Apple "asked" them to stop production -- not "sent them a cease and desist" letter.

    That's because it's far easier and cheaper to send the one than to get the big-boy lawyers involved on the other. Asking them to stop is easy. Sending a C&D letter means someone usually ends up in court.

    And it's easy to get them to listen, as well, because if they don't, Apple could pull their license to make iPod stuff.

    The article also plainly states that this stoppage may not be permanent.

    May not. But that's wishful thinking on their part. Apple doesn't want them selling the stuff, easy.

    Both of these point to the conclusion that Apple wants to work with this provider to ensure that whatever they're doing is legit and up-to-spec,

    Sorry, but it isn't any of Apple's business if it is 'up-to-spec', since they aren't asking Apple to license it. And there's no way it cannot be legit, since they aren't stealing any information. I don't see Apple talking to Western Digital about making sure their drives will fit a MacPro.

    not that they're trying to reign supreme control over the innards of the MacBook Air just because they can, or are somehow imposing "heavy handed control-freak policies."

    No, they want to reign control. There's no argument there. The argument is why. The MBA was not designed to be user accessible, and the drive was not designed to be easily removed. (Argue over whether that's apple wanting 'control' or 'trying to conserve space' all you want, either way it's Apple controlling the internal). So replacing the drive means your accessing the guts of the computer, and since most people are idiots when it comes to such things, there's a good chance they'll break something in the process. Which is why it'll void the warranty as well.

    Apple can't prevent users from opening their Airs (which, as we've seen with their battery decisions in the past, I'm assuming will be coming to more computers near you, since, well, everything needs to be smaller - smaller is better, right!). They can't prevent people from selling you standard replacement parts for your Air. They MIGHT be able to keep people from saying it is an MBA replacement kit. But they can wave a big stick over the heads of their 'partners' with the implication of "You do this, and we might decide we don't want you as a partner".

    That's what they've got here. But this won't stop other non-iPod peripheral makers from jumping on board if they want.

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