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Intel gets record Q1 2011 results, doubts PC's death

updated 06:40 pm EDT, Tue April 19, 2011

Intel Q1 2011 sees PC staying healthy

Intel posted record results on Tuesday that also cast doubt on claims of tablets hurting the market. Its revenue was up 25 percent to $12.8 billion and its net profit up by 29 percent to $3.3 billion. Most of that growth came from its datacenter chip team, whose revenue was up 32 percent, but it still saw its core PC chip group's revenue up by 17 percent as the second-generation Core (Sandy Bridge) take off.

Even the Atom processor group, the section hit worst by the arrival of tablets like the iPad, saw its revenue up four percent versus early 2010, when the iPad had been unveiled but hadn't shipped. Intel did admit that the average selling price of a chip was up from quarter-to-quarter as more portable buyers steered towards regular notebooks.

The broad increases were slightly tempered by a flat outlook where revenue would stay the same and profit would drop slightly to $3.2 billion.

CEO Paul Otellini defended the traditional computer during a fiscal results call that also challenged analyst groups like Gartner and IDC on their claims of tablets cannibalizing PC sales. Third party researchers often didn't account for sales from developing countries, he said. A greater number of generic PCs and individual component sales make it harder to track sales than in wealthier nations, where more PCs sell from major brands. Intel as the chip designer for most companies was often the most accurate source and saw modest but ongoing growth.

"Our projections for PC segment growth in 2011 remain in the low double-digit range, based on early sell-through strength we are seeing as we begin 2011," Otellini said during the call. "While it's too early to call 2012, with an improving global economy, we see no reason for growth to be materially different from what we see in 2011."

Apple is known to have had at least some effect on computer share and almost single-handedly led to a reorganization at Acer to focus more on mobile than on netbooks and budget notebooks.



By Electronista Staff
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Comments

  1. thebiggfrogg

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Jul 2007

    0

    Again, MacNN and a deceptive headline. . .

    I was going to launch into a criticism of the Intel exec regarding the response to the hyperbolic "death of the PC" remark. Then I read the copy which talked about tablets cannabilizing PC sales--a different matter entirely. Yes, tablets will take some off the top of PC sales, but making the leap about the death of the "trucks" of the computing world, as Jobs put it, is extremely premature. Though the aspersion should be cast to MacNN for a misleading headline.

  1. facebook_Timothy

    Via Facebook

    Joined: Apr 2011

    +2

    The PC Will Never Die

    As long as there are hardcore gamers, scientists, engineers, animators, and other power users, the PC will continue to live long and prosper. The current round of innovation is happening at the low-end of the power spectrum. Tablets won't eat into anything but the netbook and low-end PC sector. Same goes for iPad and iPhone.

  1. Joe05

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Nov 2010

    +1

    death of the Pc

    This is Macnn that you're referring to, if you expect objective posts from a Mac site . Think again.

  1. facebook_Charter

    Via Facebook

    Joined: Apr 2011

    +1

    http://www.busforrental.com/index.html

    Here is Similar Story

    CEO Paul Otellini defended the traditional computer during a fiscal results call that also challenged analyst groups like Gartner and IDC on their claims of tablets cannibalizing PC sales. Third party researchers often didn't account for sales from developing countries, he said. A greater number of generic PCs and individual component sales make it harder to track sales than in wealthier nations, where more PCs sell from major brands. Intel as the chip designer for most companies was often the most accurate source and saw modest but ongoing growth.

  1. SockRolid

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Jan 2010

    +1

    Not bad, considering Intel's total failure in mobi

    No, the pee cee will probably never die. But all the growth is happening in mobile now. And that's were Intel has the least success. Zero success in fact. Nokia's Meego OS was their last hope for promoting Atom in a relatively well-known platform. Oops.

    Nokia dumped Meego and Intel along with it. Nobody has adopted the Moorestown Atom chip set. Nobody. Now Intel is flogging the Medfield chip in the hopes that it will be adopted by smaller manufacturers.

    Intel Outside.

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