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Four versions of Sony's S1 tablet pass through FCC

updated 11:50 am EDT, Tue June 7, 2011

Sony S1 in four variants show up in FCC tests

The upcoming S1 tablet from Sony has recently passed through the FCC, with the interesting part being that there are four model numbers. The SGPT111US/S and SGPT112US/S are meant for the US, while the SGPT111CA/S and SGPT112CA/S are earmarked for Canadian consumption. No other information is known, as a 180-day confidentiality block is in place for the images of the devices on the FCC site.

It's likely the models will have different storage capacities, as is usually the case. It's also possible one version will be Wi-Fi only, and the other will also carry a 3G radio, compatible with WCDMA bands II and V. This makes them suitable for use on AT&T's network in the US and Rogers in Canada. The graphic below shows the label section for each device, all of which have the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth logos present. The tablet being tested by the FCC is already listed as a production unit and doesn't seem to have 3G connectivity.

The S1 tablets will run on Android 3.0, which is optimized for tablets, and connect to Sony's Qriocity media service. An IR emitter will also let them work as universal remote controls for home theater equipment. When the S1s launch or what each will cost remains to be seen but are likely to arrive in the fall. [via SlashGear]









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