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Verizon reveals FiOS Quantum with speeds up 300Mbps

updated 08:10 am EDT, Mon June 18, 2012

Verizon FiOS Quantum offers even faster connections

Verizon has revealed its latest high-speed Internet service, FiOS Quantum. The latest update to the service offers users on the top plan or service speeds of up to 300Mbps down and 65Mbps up. On a two-year contract, the price for FiOS Quantum is $205 a month, or $210 without a contract for what Verizon is calling the 'the fastest mass scale residential service in the US.'

According to Verizon, users on the top plan can download a 2-hour long high definition movie in just 2.2 minutes. Its fiber optic connection allows up to 14 devices in one household to share the connection. Users choosing the 150/65 plan will still be able to download the same 2-hour high-def movie in 4.4 minutes, while users on the 75/35 service ($145/month) will get it in 8.9 minutes. Users on the entry 50/25 service ($120/month) will have downloaded the movie in 13.3 minutes.

Some early adopters of the original fiber optic service will need to have their hardware upgraded, while others may end up paying more for their current plan without any speed boost. For example, users on a 15/5 service will now pay $10 a month more without any benefit in a move no doubt designed to encourage customers on to the next tier.



By Electronista Staff
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  1. Inkling

    Junior Member

    Joined: Jul 2006

    +2

    Pay to play

    This won't do me or my neighbors any good. Verizon has FiOS service a few miles north of me on the very street on which I live, but Seattle's politicians aren't going to let it move into my neighborhood. It'd compete with their great darling, Comcast. So our only alternative to Comcast are:

    * Century Link DSL, whose data rates are grossly overpriced unless paired with a equally overpriced phone plan most of us don't need or want. As I told one of their sales reps, their business model seems deliberately intended to fail.

    Clearwire, whose cellular like wireless system chokes when more a few people are using it at the same time. Their tower for this part of Seattle is just across the street from me, so I've thought of taking advantage of that, since my signal would stomp of that of anyone else. But that'd be behaving like a jerk.

    It's not the technology that's creating access problems. It's a crony capitalism that creates cozy little deals to enrich the few that buy off politicians. It's pay to play.

    Verizon's pricey but speedy scheme seems to make little sense of a single household, but it'd make a lot of sense either for an apartment building or for all the houses on a block. Splitting the cost ten ways would cost each household only about $20 a month.





  1. ojala

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Oct 2003

    +2

    Surprisingly expensive

    The local cable company here is offering 350/20 for less than $90 a month (70€/month). $57 a month will buy a 110/10 already.

    The full-rate ADSL2+ and 100/10 fiber go hand in hand, both are sold for less than $40 a month.

  1. testudo

    Forum Regular

    Joined: Aug 2001

    +1

    Re: Pay to play

    This won't do me or my neighbors any good. Verizon has FiOS service a few miles north of me on the very street on which I live, but Seattle's politicians aren't going to let it move into my neighborhood.

    Are you sure it's the politicians and not Verizon themselves who have decided not to enter your neighborhood? Oh, I know, they blame the politicians, so it must be true. It couldn't be that they might not see the benefit of spending the money to come down farther on your street.

    BTW, the politicians can't stop a telecom from laying cable down to bring voice or internet to your home. It's a federal law (right up with how local politicians can't stop a telecom from putting up a cell tower wherever the heck they feel like it, assuming they have permission or own the land).

    It'd compete with their great darling, Comcast. So our only alternative to Comcast are:

    * Century Link DSL, whose data rates are grossly overpriced unless paired with a equally overpriced phone plan most of us don't need or want. As I told one of their sales reps, their business model seems deliberately intended to fail.


    As opposed to Verizon or Comcast, who both have hugely overpriced internet rates unless you start a bundling.

    It's not the technology that's creating access problems. It's a crony capitalism that creates cozy little deals to enrich the few that buy off politicians. It's pay to play.

    Where I live, Comcast's objection was that Verizon was trying to provide services without paying the same fees and follow the same rules they are obliged to follow, the same way that Verizon whines about Comcast not having to follow the same rules for voice that they have to follow. The fact is, regulation hasn't kept up with technology, so FiOS is considered a data service and not required to heed telecommunications' laws, while a copper line to your house does.

    Verizon's pricey but speedy scheme seems to make little sense of a single household, but it'd make a lot of sense either for an apartment building or for all the houses on a block. Splitting the cost ten ways would cost each household only about $20 a month.

    Except it doesn't work that way. It's for a household and only a household. (I thought everyone was into video downloads and instant-viewing and stuff like that, where such a speedy connection would pay for itself in no delays).

    And if no one wants it, they'll just shelve it as an option.

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