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Samsung to target enterprise in next smartphone push

updated 11:09 pm EDT, Sat June 23, 2012

New security standards aimed at businesses added

Samsung is looking to make its smartphones more attractive to the enterprise sector, wishing to take advantage of the growing Bring Your Own Device trend as well as make Samsung a leading name in corporate computing. Speaking with The Financial Times, Samsung execs touted improved security standards for their handsets, features the company hopes will help business IT professionals get over any lingering concerns about integrating Android handsets into their operations.

Recent research suggests that 80 percent of American employees now use a personally-owned device for work-related functions. Of that figure, 38 percent use a smartphone for work, while 15 percent use a tablet. Typically, the operating systems on these devices (if they aren't running iOS) lack corporate-level security features, and Samsung aims to position its devices to address that concern.

To that end, the company is touting its Samsung Approved For Enterprise (SAFE) standard, which the Galaxy S III will be the first handset to bear. SAFE-certification entails on-device AES-256 bit encryption, support for Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync, and support for Virtual Private Network and Mobile Device Management software and services.

Samsung feels the enterprise sector is still a competitive field when it comes to mobile devices, even given Apple's strong position with its iPad and iPhone offerings. Samsung's internal research indicates that only 18 percent of companies have a comprehensive mobile strategy, while nearly half are still developing such a strategy. By rolling out its own enterprise-oriented security certifications, the company hopes it can remove any remaining stigmas such as security and virus issues that have plagued Android users.



By Electronista Staff
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Comments

  1. simon42

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: Apr 2010

    +1

    Wait

    They want to allow the company that bought the device to mess with it and control what's on it? Isn't everything supposed to be hermetically closed so that only the maker of the device can do that? What's next, they'll allow the user to take control??

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