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New Matrox Avio F125 sends KVM signal up to 2.5 miles

updated 11:37 pm EDT, Wed March 13, 2013

Four USB 2.0 ports, dual-link DVI broadcast over cable

Matrox Graphics on Wednesday announced the Matrox Avio F125, a fiber-optic KVM extender which separates dual HD video, keyboard, mouse, stereo analog audio and USB 2.0 devices from a workstation. The Avio F125 transmitter/receiver pair extends two single-link DVI (2x1920x1200) or one dual-link DVI (2560x1600 or 4096x2160) video, and multiple high-speed USB 2.0-compliant devices from the host computer by up to 400 meters (1312 feet) over multimode cable, and up to four kilometers (2.5 miles) over single-mode cable.

The device features HD, 2K and 4K video playback without any dropped frames, keyboard and mouse extension via two USB HID ports or PS/2 connectors, support for four USB 2.0 ports on the receiver unit for USB 2.0 high-speed peripherals, including the ability to handle isochronous audio and video devices. Local outputs on the Avio transmitter unit allow sharing the remote desktop on a collaborative video wall. Both the transmitter and receiver are rack-mountable or standalone units and are compatible with Windows, Linux, UNIX and Mac OS X operating systems, without need of drivers.

The Avio F120 Transmitter or receiver retail for $1,999 each, and are available from Matrox directly.



By Electronista Staff
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