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AllSeen Alliance group of companies to work on 'Internet of Things'

updated 07:19 am EST, Tue December 10, 2013

Platform for interconnected devices based on Qualcomm Toq app software

A group of companies have banded together to help foster the adoption of interconnected devices, also known as the "Internet of Things" or the "Internet of Everything." Announced by the Linux Foundation, members of the AllSeen Alliance hope to work together on building a software platform for all of the devices to connect and communicate across.

The alliance will build upon the Qualcomm AllJoyn open source software platform, something already used by the Toq smart watch, with the software framework allowing for communication across Wi-Fi, Ethernet, and powerline networking, without the need for Internet access, and between devices from various manufacturers. Engineers from alliance companies and members of the open source community will expand the platform's usefulness, with the initial codebase being provided to developers through the alliance's website.

Qualcomm Toq already uses AllJoyn platform
Qualcomm Toq already uses AllJoyn platform


The group of companies signing up for the effort is extensive and broad-ranging, reports. VentureBeat reports that, aside from the Linux Foundation and Qualcomm, the list includes LG, Panasonic, Sharp, Cisco, D-Link, doubleTwist, Fon, HTC, Sears, Lite-on, and TP-Link.

Jim Zemlin, executive director at the Linux Foundation, believes that the AllSeen Alliance "represents an unprecedented opportunity to advance the Internet of Everything for both home and industry." Rob Chandhok of Qualcomm said "The direct peer interactions that the AllJoyn-based framework enables will greatly enrich user experiences. We envision that users will be able to add the benefits of 'the Internet of Things near me' to the cloud-based services they already enjoy."

The basic idea of the Internet of Things is to allow devices and systems to automatically communicate with each other, allowing them to pass on or act upon specific information. Examples of its use include a refrigerator informing a shopping list mobile app that it is low on milk, or the resetting of a student's alarm clock if school for the day is canceled.



By Electronista Staff
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