Printed from http://www.electronista.com

Oledcomm demonstrates LiFi light-based communication system

updated 07:21 pm EST, Sun January 12, 2014

Smartphone-mounted light sensor can receive data from lamps

A method for sending data using light was shown at CES by a company called Oledcomm, a system it called LiFi. Demonstrated on the show floor using an Android smartphone with its front camera replaced with a light sensor, the system allows for devices to communicate using pulses of light, with the rapidity of flashes making the light source look as if it is a static light.



The system allows for communications speeds of up to 10Mbps, reports Engadget, demonstrated through a sensor-equipped notebook being shined on by a lamp. A more practical demonstration showed a variety of lamps triggering the showing of videos and images preloaded onto devices when the sensor-equipped smartphone was held nearby, though it also used an accessory that can plug into the headphone socket for adding the technology to existing devices. Though it showed the possibility of pushing data to mobile devices using light, the company suggests it could be used in the future for in-store advertising and indoor geolocation.

Oledcomm may have a tough time getting LiFi to market, as it has to convince manufacturers to add it alongside already-existing and similar communication methods, such as Wi-Fi, NFC, Bluetooth, and in older devices, infrared.



By Electronista Staff
toggle

Comments

Login Here

Not a member of the MacNN forums? Register now for free.

toggle

Network Headlines

toggle

Most Popular

Sponsor

Recent Reviews

Dell AD211 Bluetooth speaker

For all of the high-priced, over-engineered Bluetooth speakers in the electronics market, there is still room for mass-market solution ...

VisionTek 128GB USB Pocket SSD

USB flash drives dealt the death blow to both the floppy and Zip drives. While still faster than either of the old removable media, sp ...

Kodak PixPro SL10 Smart Lens Camera

Smartphone imagery still widely varies. Large Megapixel counts don't make for a good image, and the optics in some devices are lacking ...

Sponsor

toggle

Most Commented

 
toggle

Popular News