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Google Fiber will not charge online services for content peering

updated 04:31 pm EDT, Thu May 22, 2014

Google takes stance against Comcast, Verizon charging for 'last mile' access

Google will not charge Internet services to host their content at Google Fiber locations, it has revealed. A Google Fiber blog post states the Internet service provider will provide free colocation at its Fiber facilities for services like Netflix, rather than following the lead of Comcast and Verizon in charging for direct access to the last mile connection to the customer.

The blog post from Jeffrey Burgan, Director of Network Engineering at Google Fiber, confirms the company makes peering agreements with content providers. "We have also worked with services like Netflix so that they can 'colocate' their equipment in our Fiber facilities," said Burgan, explaining it is a shorter distance for videos to be fetched from its data centers than to fetch it from the closest Netflix-owned version, in turn making the connection faster for customers. "Because the servers are closer to where you live, your content will get to you faster, and should be a higher quality."

"We give companies like Netflix and Akami free access to space and power in our facilities and they provide their own content servers," Burgan advises, continuing "We don't make money from peering or colocation: since people usually only stream one video at a time, video traffic doesn't bog down or change the way we manage our network in any meaningful way - so why not help enable it?"

Burgan goes on to claim it is a "win-win-win situation," as content providers can provide high-quality streams to customers, it saves Google Fiber money from extra bandwidth costs, and it provides Fiber users the fastest possible connection to content. "All-in-all, these arrangements help you experience the best access to content on the Internet - which is the whole point of getting Fiber to begin with!"

Netflix was forced to enter into agreements with Comcast, Verizon, and reportedly one Norwegian ISP, where it pays for colocation similar to what Google Fiber is offering, all to minimize the degradation of service. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler revealed earlier this week the commission will be looking into peering arrangements that have already been made, as well as the impact of this and "paid prioritization" initiatives on Internet connections and web services.



By Electronista Staff
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