Printed from http://www.electronista.com

Apple responds to China media report of iOS 'national security issue'

updated 03:00 pm EDT, Sat July 12, 2014

Apple defines what location tracking does, how it works

Apple has responded to Chinese government media allegations of the iPhone and iPad being a national security threat. A Chinese-language statement titled "Your Location Privacy" has been posted by the Cupertino manufacturer, with the company guaranteeing that it won't track users, or share information location with outsiders. Additionally, it claims that the "frequent locations" feature touted for iOS8 will just "quickly and reliably determine their current locations for specific activities such as shopping, travel, finding the nearest restaurant or calculating the amount of time it takes them to get to work," and not leak any personal data.

State broadcaster CCTV reports sometimes force companies to change policies or recall products. The report also quoted officials as saying that China needs stiffer data protection laws, and that Apple would have to "take on any legal responsibilities" for data leaks.

In the statement that took only one day to craft, Apple says that it "appreciates CCTV's effort to help educate customers on a topic we think is very important. We want to make sure all of our customers in China are clear about what we do and we don't do when it comes to privacy and your personal data."

The company claims that the feature encrypts data and stores it locally on the device only. It says that "Apple gives customers control over collection and use of location data on all our devices. Customers have to make the choice to enable Location Services, it is not a default setting. Apple does not allow any app to receive device location information without first receiving the user's explicit consent through a simple pop-up alert. This alert is mandatory and cannot be overridden."

Finishing its remarks, Apple says that the company has "never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will. It's something we feel very strongly about."



By Electronista Staff
Post tools:

TAGS :

toggle

Comments

  1. The Vicar

    Junior Member

    Joined: 07-01-09

    Oh, please. The Chinese government complaining about privacy issues is EXACTLY as stupid as the NSA complaining about privacy issues. You don't get to complain about something which VOLUNTARILY lets people do what you've been doing to them without their permission.

  1. Charles Martin

    MacNN Editor

    Joined: 08-04-01

    As with the US, the Chinese have a great deal more to fear from their government and state-run media than they do from Apple.

  1. Alann

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: 11-27-10

    "Apple says that the company has "never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will. It's something we feel very strongly about."

    Who needs a back door? When the Chinese government says "Hand over the data on X, Y, and Z dissidents or lose permission to operate in China," that would be the Front Door.

Login Here

Not a member of the MacNN forums? Register now for free.

toggle

Network Headlines

toggle

Most Popular

Sponsor

Recent Reviews

Asus Chromebook C300

When Chromebooks hit the market back in 2011, consumers didn't know what to do with them. The low-cost laptops, powered by Google's Ch ...

Plantronics BackBeat Pro Bluetooth headphones

Looking for a pair of headphones that can do everything a user requires is a task that can take some study. Trying to decide on in-ear ...

Lemur BlueDriver

"Oh no, the check engine light is on…again! What one of the hundreds of reasons could it be this time? Probably going to cost a fort ...

Sponsor

toggle

Most Commented

 
toggle

Popular News