Review: Accordeon for iPad

Play a beautiful accordion on your iPad or iPhone. (April 8th, 2010)

If your bucket list includes learning a new instrument, then the Accordéon is right up your alley. It’s an impressively simple application that shows you an image of an accordion that you can play. Just think, you can serenade the participants at any even of your choosing. The excellent multi-touch support lets you press several keys at once and they all register correctly.

Electronista Rating:

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Product Manufacturer: Alex Komarov and Sergey Rachok

Price: $1.99

The Good

  • Beautiful graphics.
    Fun.
    Easy to play–though hard to play well.

The Bad

  • Does not come with a monkey
    Could use a manual or tutorial.

Now that you have your new iPad, there is no better tool to learn something new, fun, and different. If your bucket list includes learning a creative new instrument, then the Accordéon is right up your alley. Just think, you can serenade the participants at your next relative's wedding or bar mitzvah.

The Accordéon for the iPad is an impressively simple application. It shows you an image of an accordion and you can play it by pushing the buttons and the piano keys on the screen. The well-done and detailed graphics make your iPad look like the front of an accordion-without the bellows and with fewer keys.

 accordion screen

Press a Key-Any Key


The excellent multi-touch support lets you press several keys at once and they all register correctly. Since I have no experience playing the accordion, all I was able to do was make noises, some pleasant, others not so much.

 accordion screen

Marshall At The Keys


You cannot rotate the accordion. The piano keys are always next to the home button, and the accordion is always in landscape mode. However, since you really have to put the iPad on front of you with the screen facing out to play it, I don't think that is a drawback.

There is only one setting in Accordéon, nothing to adjust except a single slider on the front. One end of the slider is marked Maj, with a happy face, and the other Min, with a sad face. The developer confirmed that Maj equates to the major scale, which are the "Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Ti/Si(Do)" notes. Min offers the minor scale and you can choose to play in either scale. This controls the chords put out by some of the keys on the left side of the accordion.

 accordion buttons

Scale Slider


The developer believes the happy and sad faces simply indicate to you that the major scale is more upbeat than the minor scale. When the slider is on the sad face, some of the chords definitely sound sadder.

Here is a short demonstration video showing how to play the accordion.



We have suggested to the developer that a short manual with an explanation of the two scales be included in future updates. Tapping on the I button takes you to an about screen, with a link to the web site. An iPhone version was also released this week, and only requires smaller fingers to play well. When first released Accordéon cost $3.99, but now is available for $1.99 at the iTunes store.

by Marshall Clow and Ilene Hoffman


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